Pupil Premium

Pupil Premium 2019/20

Pupil premium strategy / self-evaluation Inmans Primary School

1.  Summary information
School Inmans Primary School
Academic Year 2019/20 Total PP budget 54000 Date of most recent PP Review 09.19
Total number of pupils 399 Number of pupils eligible for PP 46 Date for next internal review of this strategy 12.19

 

2. Current attainment
KS2 All pupils Pupils eligible for PP (11) National
% achieving expected standard in RWM 71% 27% 65%
% achieving expected standard in Reading 73% 27% 73%
Progress in reading -1.5 -2.61  
% achieving expected standard in Writing 81% 45% 79%
Progress in Writing -.24 -3.08  
% achieving expected standard in Maths 78% 45% 79%
Progress in Maths 0.25 -1.71  
 
KS1 All pupils Pupils eligible for PP (10) National
% achieving expected standard in Reading 79% 80 75%
% achieving expected standard in Writing 80% 90 69%
% achieving expected standard in Maths 70% 80 76%
 
Year 1 Phonics All pupils Pupils eligible for PP (5) National
% meeting the expected standard in Phonics 83% 60% 82%
 
Year 2 Phonics All pupils Pupils eligible for PP (10) National
% meeting the expected standard in Phonics 95% 100% 91%
 
EYFS All pupils Pupils eligible for PP (2) National
% achieving GLD 76% 100% 72%

 

3.    Barriers to future attainment (for pupils eligible for PP)
Academic barriers (issues to be addressed in school, such as poor oral language skills)
A.    Higher % of PP pupils are identified with SEND profile of cohorts vary and require different types on support.
B.    Low starting points – requiring accelerated learning and/or moving to Inmans from other schools
C. Levels of concentration and overall self-confidence is low for a significant number of PP pupils
Additional barriers (including issues which also require action outside school, such as low attendance rates)
D. Parental support – low aspiration and lack of engagement with school
E. Complex home circumstances sometimes requiring agency support
4.    Intended outcomes (specific outcomes and how they will be measured) Success criteria
A.     Pupils make at least expected progress as measured from statutory starting points Flight paths
B.     Pupils attend school ready to learn – attendance data measured alongside a day in the life Attendance data/monitoring of individual pupils
C.     Increased parental engagement with school and then the learning – measured parental support Parental attendance at school events
D.     Parents are supported before and during children joining school and throughout the year Parent view
       

 

5.  Review of expenditure
Previous Academic Year 2018 – 2019
    i.   Quality of teaching for all
Action Intended outcome Estimated impact: Did you meet the success criteria? (Include impact on pupils not eligible for PP, if appropriate).

Lessons learned

(and whether you will continue with this approach)

Cost
HLTA support to reduce group sizes in classes specifically focused on PP pupils. PP pupils make at least expected progress and where possible achieve above non PP pupils. For cohorts EYFS to Y5 – progress in line with starting points. In Y6 (significant SEND) meant that the gaps were too wide to bridge meaning children didn’t all make expected progress. Other successes for that cohort include successful transition to secondary school.   

Pupils felt supported and achieved well.

Positive impact on the full class not just the PP pupils.

Small step learning and pre teaching could take place.

 

£23111
Provide challenge for more able PP pupils to maximise progress Identified pupils (from FFT & use of PAGS) to reach GDS KS1 increase in number of pupils achieving GDS. At KS2 2 pupils achieved more than there PAG in reading, however this is counter balanced with very low progress scores for pupils with SEND. Reading box continues to work. Maths box isn’t as consistent and requires a review with pupils. Make PP chn the first priority for target setting. £0
  ii.   Targeted support
Action Intended outcome Estimated impact: Did you meet the success criteria? (Include impact on pupils not eligible for PP, if appropriate).

Lessons learned

(and whether you will continue with this approach)

Cost
Accelerate progress for PP pupils through interventions ensuring that all make at least expected progress PP pupils make at least expected progress and where possible achieve above non PP pupils. For cohorts EYFS to Y5 – progress in line with starting points. In Y6 (significant SEND) meant that the gaps were too wide to bridge meaning children didn’t all make expected progress. Other successes for that cohort include successful transition to secondary school.    This is closely matched to the individual needs of the pupil. The SEN tracker this year will help the coordinator and the teachers focus on SMART targets. £20166
 iii.   Other approaches
Action Intended outcome Estimated impact: Did you meet the success criteria? (Include impact on pupils not eligible for PP, if appropriate).

Lessons learned

(and whether you will continue with this approach)

Cost
Target support – HLTA PP coordinator oversees each individual PP pupil to ensure that a holistic approach is taken to meet all needs Coordinator acts as the link between home and school as necessary. Ensure pupil is school ready each day and also carry out any interventions required.

All PP pupils have benefitted from interventions chosen to either scaffold learning or to extend learning for more able pupils.

 

 

 

 

 

 

For some families – situations move into Early Help. Accessing advice and support from the BST has successfully impacted for some pupils.  
Promote good home-school links and increase attendance Pupils will contribute to the pupil profile for further information via home visits, telephone calls and organised events.

10 pupils have accessed breakfast club and have been in school ready for the day

PP coordinator has built links with some families which means that communication is easier overall.

Attendance has dropped to 94%. This was disappointing however was adversely affected on one pupil who has had a slow integration into school due to a health condition,

School pay for pupil trips and clubs

This is a successful strategy for some families and will be developed by the introduction of a parents’ questionnaire.

£2582

 

£11395

 

 

 

£6646

6.  Planned expenditure
A Academic year 2019- 2020
           
The three headings enable you to demonstrate how you are using the Pupil Premium to improve classroom pedagogy, provide targeted support and support whole school strategies
    i.   Quality of teaching for all
Action Intended outcome What is the evidence and rationale for this choice? How will you ensure it is implemented well? Staff lead When will you review implementation?
Use coaching strategies to further develop teachers’ ability to scaffold and stretch activities Ensure that all teaching remains good and outstanding teaching increases Pupils with low and high starting points need to be the focus to ensure that they make at least expected progress and maximise all time in lessons Through monitoring books and lessons. Teaches will also coach each other. SF Ongoing
Further develop reading skills of PP pupils through targeted intervention Ensure that all pupils make at least expected progress

The gap in progress is widest in this subject.  Even though other year group data indicates that pupils are making expected progress, the focus needs to remain on this to increase vocabulary and understanding.

 

Through monitoring lessons and the teaching of reading VJ Termly
Total budgeted cost 22400
  ii.   Targeted support
Action Intended outcome What is the evidence and rationale for this choice? How will you ensure it is implemented well? Staff lead When will you review implementation?
Target all PP pupils to read at least three times a week Pupils read more fluently and enjoy reading. They make a least expected progress.

The gap in progress is widest in this subject.  Even though other year group data indicates that pupils are making expected progress, the focus needs to remain on this to increase vocabulary and understanding.

 

Monitoring of reading.

Benchmarking scores

VJ Termly
To target and support all PP children to have an attendance rate above 96% Pupils are in school, ready to engage and learn Attendance has dropped and with targeted support we can raise the % to be more in line with non PP pupils.

Weekly tracking chn. Collecting if transport/illness is an issue.

 

FW Weekly
Improve social and emotional skills of targeted PP pupils Pupils are resilient and their on task behaviour is improved PP pupils often have other outside events affecting their emotions. This then impacts on their ability to focus and learn Matching needs to intervention with the ELSA. Parents will engage and encourage the work JL/SF Ongoing
Total budgeted cost £11426
 iii.   Other approaches
Action Intended outcome What is the evidence and rationale for this choice? How will you ensure it is implemented well? Staff lead When will you review implementation?
Parental choice for additional spending Parental support and participation increases Children have different opportunities offered to them. Monitor the questionnaire feedback and repeat half yearly. JH Termly
Pay for clubs – specifically extended clubs To ensure chn are ready for the day Chn who attend breakfast club are ready for the school day. Feedback from staff members. Observing the children in lessons – a day in the life of. SF/JH Ongoing
Total budgeted cost £20211
7.    Additional detail

The pupil premium is allocated to schools for:

Children of statutory school age from low-income families who have been eligible for free school meals at any point in the last 6 years (FSM); Children who have been looked after continuously for more than six months; Children whose parents are currently working in the armed forces.

PPG provides funding for two policies:

• Raising the attainment of disadvantaged pupils and closing the gap with their peers; and

• Supporting children and young people with parents in the regular armed forces

The PPG per pupil for 2018-2019 was as follows:

·         Disadvantaged pupils Pupil Premium per pupil Pupils in Year Groups R to 6 recorded as Ever 6 FSM £1,300

·         Looked After Children (LAC) £1,900 Service children Pupils in Year Groups R to 11 recorded as Ever 4

·         Service Child or in receipt of a child pension from the Ministry of Defence. £300

The DFE offer the following guidance: In most cases the Pupil Premium is allocated to schools and is clearly identifiable. It is for schools to decide how the Pupil Premium, allocated to schools per FSM pupil, is spent, since they are best placed to assess what additional provision should be made for the individual pupils within their responsibility.

However they also state that: Schools are free to spend the Pupil Premium as they see fit. However, they will be held accountable for how they have used the additional funding to support pupils from low-income families. The purpose of this report is to inform parents, carers and governors how much pupil premium the school received for 2018-19, how it was spent and the impact at had on pupils’ achievement. The report also explains how the pupil premium for 2019-20 will be used. The current percentage of pupils classed as Ever 6 for FSM is 11%, below the national average. This number has dropped over the last few years. However New to Inmans pupils (pupils who join after EYFS or Y2) often are Pupil premium – currently 30%.

Inmans is affected by the decision for all pupils in EYFS and KS1 to have free school meals. This means very few families need to register to become FSM despite incentives introduced by the school. Consequently, the school receives a smaller amount of deprivation funding than most schools nationally.

Many more pupils in the school come from low-income backgrounds and although not eligible for the pupil premium some aspects of the school spend reflects the need for these pupils also.

 

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